A functional Commodore 64 built with Lego and Raspberry Pi #PiDay #Commodore #Lego #C64 #VintageComputing #RetroComputing @Raspberry_Pi

A functional Commodore 64 built with Lego and Raspberry Pi #PiDay #Commodore #Lego #C64 #VintageComputing #RetroComputing @Raspberry_Pi

THE BRIXTY FOUR: COMMODORE 64 BUILT WITH LEGO

Via the Raspberry Pi blog, we love this project combining a Raspberry Pi and Commodore styling

Created by retro fanatic Christian Simpson, aka Perifractic, the Brixty Four is a joy(stick) to behold. Inspired by a two-inch long Lego C64 produced by Chris McVeigh, it was initially developed as a replacement full-size bread-bin-style case for the 8-bit computer, with the sole intention of putting an actual C64 motherboard and keyboard inside. But then Perifractic’s attention shifted to the Raspberry Pi.

He realised he could slip a Pi into the case and hook it up to a C64 keyboard using an interface called the Keyrah V2b which allows classic Commodore computer keyboards to be connected to modern-day machines. It has proven popular for owners of old 8- and 16-bit computers as diverse as the VIC-20 and the Amiga and it works a treat. “The Keyrah V2b allows the Pi to communicate with the C64 via USB,” he explains.

The Brixty Four: Quick Facts

  • 2192 bricks were used in the Brixty Four project
  • The case alone can use $299 worth of bricks
  • There are full, free building instructions
  • Perifractic spent six weeks on the design
  • The bricks were sourced from Bricklink

Inside The Brixty Four
After popping a Raspberry Pi in the case, the innards could also contain some illustrative Lego chips

“The biggest obstacle was the price – these bricks are rare and used, so to build this machine is costly,” he says. “The second obstacle was time, but I wanted to make my final design free and open-source.” The results, however, have been more than worth the investment.

See the video below and read the entire article in-depth on the Raspberry Pi blog.